Letter to the Editor

In his guest editorial, former Alcor President Steve Bridge talks about
why there aren’t more medical professionals involved in cryonics.
Isn’t it because they are taught in all their education that people who
are clinically dead are just that, dead? And that there is no sense
doing anything else for them? If that is what their mindset is,
isn’t asking them to participate in cryonics like asking them to
participate in the activities of morticians preparing bodies for
funerals? At least that’s how they would see it, right?

Steve Bridge Replies:
Yes, that is certainly part of the problem; but that is the part of the problem that we already understand. “Dead is Dead” has been the rigid misunderstanding of most people in all fields for centuries at least, in spite of frequent cases in contemporary medicine where the label of “dead” was misapplied. However, most of the medical professionals who DO understand this point still do not get involved in helping with cryopreservation procedures or research. We need to understand how to break through that next level of resistance.

Jennifer Chapman also comments:
Thank you for your comments. Cryonics does require a shift in the
perception of death. A person who has a heart attack and is “dead” in the
clinical sense but is revived using CPR or a defibrillator was not dead at
all. If medical professionals are willing to reconsider the standard
definition of death used today, they may also see cryonics patients as
potentially viable, only farther in the future.

Employment Opportunities

Have you ever thought about joining the Alcor team? We have opportunities for Physicians, licensed Paramedics, Emergency Medical Technicians, Registered Nurses, Lab Technicians and more to join our nationwide Transport Team. Participation is on a contractual basis. You’ll be given cryonics training enabling you to participate in our patient rescue and transport cases. Licensed professionals do not have to be Alcor members to join our team. We welcome your expertise and interest. Send your resume to: employment@alcor.org

Florida Training Complete

Our training session in Florida was well-attended, with the entire staff of Suspended Animation and other local cryonicists bringing the number of students to fifteen. Course curriculum included our biohazard and communicable disease lecture, airway management (including Combi-tube), medications, intraosseous IV placement training, and manual cardiopulmonary support practice.

Our next stabilization training session will be held in the Los Angeles area later this month (August 19-20). We’ll be training both old and new members of Alcor’s transport team, and hope to see an expansion of individuals available for standbys and stabilizations.

Anyone interested in attending should contact our Readiness Coordinator, Michelle Fry (michelle@alcor.org).

Alcor News #53

Alcor News, July 2006
Your source for insider’s info July 2006, #53

Alcor Welcomes Intern Chana Williford
Chana Williford will be working as an intern at Alcor for a few months to build a whole body vitrification laboratory. Chana attends school in Texas and has a B.S. in Psychology, a M.S. in Cognition and Neuroscience and is working towards her Ph.D. in Neurophysiology at the University of Texas at Dallas. She has taught there as an assistant instructor in neuroscience lab methods and has worked as a research assistant in a variety of laboratory environments. She will utilize her experience conducting experiments and writing supporting documentation to establish Alcor’s lab.

REGISTER TODAY for the 6th Alcor Conference
An Inside Look at the Science and Medicine of Tomorrow. Registration is now open for the 6th Alcor Conference being held at the Scottsdale Marriott in Arizona from October 6-8. The early rate of $295 is only in effect for a few more weeks! Register by August 1. Visit www.alcor.org to register. Check the website regularly for full conference details and updates. [JC] REGISTER NOW

Robert A. Freitas Jr. Research Grant
In Cryonics Magazine Spring 2006, there was an article about the theoretical engineering work on nanomedicine being conducted by Robert A. Freitas Jr., which was supported in part by a grant from Alcor in 2004. The Alcor Board of Directors is pleased to announce that it has voted to make another $20,000 grant to Dr. Freitas. Dr. Freitas is doing work that is directly related to the problem of repairing and reviving Alcor’s most damaged patients. While this is still in the very early stages, Alcor feels a small investment now can make a big difference later. You can learn more and read a free copy of the first two volumes of Dr. Freitas’ multipart book “Nanomedicine” by visiting www.nanomedicine.com. [SVS]

Vitrification Rediscovered?
Alcor has received many questions about a press release issued by the American Chemical Society (ACS) entitled, “Slow-frozen people, latest research supports possibility of cryopreservation.” The press release, which received significant media attention when United Press International (UPI) picked up the story, was based on a scientific paper by Anatoli Bogdan of the University of Helsinki that appeared in the July 6th issue of the ACS Journal of Physical Chemistry B. The paper described vitrification of microscopic droplets of water using sulfuric acid(!) as a cryoprotectant. While the paper contains some interesting technical observations, the “breakthrough” announced in the press release was merely a restatement of the physical principles of ice avoidance by vitrification as already known and used in cryobiology for decades. Alcor itself has been using “glassy water” or “low-density amorphous ice” (aka vitrification) to avoid physical damage from ice during brain cryopreservation since the turn of the century.

Even if the idea of vitrification isn’t new, it is still gratifying to see it thrust into public awareness, and its relevance to cryonics recognized. In the press release, Dr. Bodgan said, “It may seem fantastic, but the fact that in aqueous solution, [the] water component can be slowly supercooled to the glassy state and warmed back without the crystallization implies that, in principle, if the suitable cryoprotectant is created, cells in plants and living matter could withstand a large supercooling and survive.” We couldn’t agree more. With continuing progress in reducing toxicity of cryoprotectants used for vitrification, we expect that it will be possible to reversibly vitrify larger and larger organs in years to come, and perhaps eventually the whole human body. [BW]

Research Update
Repairs are completed on Alcor’s differential scanning calorimeter (DSC-7), and the software necessary to operate the device has been purchased. This unit will be used in nucleation mapping of the M22 cryoprotectant to determine the temperatures and cooling/warming rates that cause ice to form. The Planer, a controlled-rate freezer, has also been repaired. This is used for carefully controlling the temperature of biological samples and is important to upcoming research.

Setup of Alcor’s research library has begun. With the recent acquisition of new journal subscriptions and a general lack of accessibility when it comes to books and magazines, the useful materials needed to be consolidated in one place.

This month has been a busy one for improvements in both research and clinical response. The remote stabilization kits which Alcor takes into the field when responding to emergencies have been reorganized to streamline them considerably. These kits are also used during training sessions and will be easier to use ease in training demonstrations.

Dr. Sergey Sheleg, Senior Research Scientist, is discussing experimental details with scientists at 21st Century Medicine in Rancho Cucamonga, CA. He obtained the M22 fixative to repeat his M22 brain vitrification experiments and obtain electron microscopy images of the vitrified brain. Dr. Sheleg also worked with Dr. Stephen Coons (Barrow Neurological Institute, Phoenix, AZ) on a manuscript dealing with morphological changes in neurons during prolonged brain normothermic anoxia. [TJ, SSH]

Training Dates: Florida & Texas
Florida: July 22 & 23 at Suspended Animation Inc in Boynton Beach
Texas: September 23 & 24 at the home of an Alcor member in Austin
The Saturday training session will be from 8am-5pm on the above weekends. The Sunday training will be a half-day session followed by a Sunday evening party for local members and supporters who have sent an RSVP. Announcements with exact times and locations will be sent separately.

Alcor training sessions are given throughout the year in a variety of locations for the purpose of training individuals to perform cryopreservation stabilization and transport procedures. Following training, you will become a member of the Regional Transport Team in your area and may be contacted if an Alcor member needs help.

Training sessions are attended by one or more Alcor personnel and offer an introduction to biohazard and safety protocols, advanced airway management, cardiopulmonary support and blood washout procedures. Training also includes introductions to negotiating with medical personnel, families and medical examiners or coroners.

Local medical professionals and members of Alcor or other cryonics organizations are eligible to attend. There is no charge for attendance but each person is responsible for their own travel and hotel expenses.

Please email Michelle Fry (michelle@alcor.org) if you would like to attend either to become certified or just to observe. [JC]

Liquid Nitrogen Sensors
General maintenance has been performed on the liquid nitrogen level sensors on all patient care dewars. [SVS]

Marketing & Media
Tanya Jones and David Pizer were interviewed for an article published on the front page of the Tuesday, July 4th issue of the Scottsdale Tribune. The article offered general information about cryonics and Alcor. [JC]
See July 3 entry for recent news coverage about Alcor.

800 Members Strong
On June 30, 2006, Alcor had 800 members on its Emergency Responsibility List. Six memberships were approved during this month, no memberships were reinstated, one membership was cancelled and no members were cryopreserved. Overall, there was a net gain of five members this month. Join Alcor in celebrating this milestone. [DC]

Cryonics Magazine
Do you have an idea for Cryonics magazine? Are you interested in publishing an advertisement? Contact the editor: jennifer@alcor.org

Next Board Meeting
The next Board meeting is scheduled for Saturday, August 5, 2006, at 11:00 AM (MST). Board meetings are typically held on the first Saturday of the month at the Alcor facility (7895 East Acoma Drive in Scottsdale, AZ). Members and the public are encouraged to attend.

Employment Opportunities
Have you ever thought about joining the Alcor team? We have opportunities for licensed Paramedics, Emergency Medical Technicians, Registered Nurses, Lab Technicians and more to join our nationwide Transport Team. Participation is on a contractual basis. You’ll be given cryonics training enabling you to participate in our patient rescue and transport cases. Licensed professionals do not have to be Alcor members to join our team. We welcome your expertise and interest. Send your resume to: employment@alcor.org

Alcor United
Alcor members have a new forum where they can meet and chat with other members. Get to know other cryonics supporters in your area and around the world by visiting Alcor United (www.alcorunited.org).

Alcor News #52

Alcor News, June 2006
Your source for insider’s info June 2006, #52

Michelle Fry Joins Alcor as Readiness Coordinator
We are pleased to announce the hiring of a new Readiness Coordinator. Michelle Fry comes to us from a group of EMTs based in Laughlin, Nevada. She has participated in several standbys and one cryoprotection over the past two years and has a background in security. Michelle took the initiative last year to fill one of the main gaps in Alcor’s training protocols. She contacted the local Coroner in Mohave County, Arizona, and received training in femoral cut-downs (surgery to access blood vessels in the leg during blood washout). With her direct medical and pathology experience, Michelle is well-suited to step into the readiness role and learn the particulars of cryonics.

This hiring decision was made sooner than we had originally planned, because our Transport Coordinator, Bill Voice, was accepted to an accelerated nursing program at a local community college. For the next three semesters, he will be working part-time at Alcor while he completes his nursing credentials. [TJ]

REGISTER TODAY for the 6th Alcor Conference: An Inside Look at the Science and Medicine of Tomorrow. Registration is now open for the 6th Alcor Conference being held at the Scottsdale Marriott in Arizona from October 6-8. The early rate of $295 is in effect until August 1. Visit www.alcor.org to register. Check the website regularly for full conference details and updates. [JC]

Proposed Research Collaboration
Dr. Sergey Sheleg, Alcor Senior Research Scientist, is investigating collaborative projects with scientists from Russia. One possible collaboration with Prof. Natalia Gulyaeva, D.Sc. (Institute of Higher Nervous Activity and Neurophysiology, Russian Academy of Sciences) will study changes in the cellular biology of neurons after vitrification. Dr. Sheleg plans to visit two Russian research institutions in October, along with Steve Van Sickle, to further explore the possibilities. [SSH]

Research Capability Progress
A number of laboratory instruments are being refurbished both in-house and at specialty firms. This, combined with the space that has been freed up by recent construction, has expanded Alcor’s research capability. [SVS]

Whole-Body Patient Transport – Nitrogen Shipper
Members of Alcor’s technical team spoke with the engineer responsible for the Cryoporter system, a sample transport system for cryogenic temperatures (below -150°C), about the possibility of developing a whole-body shipper for Alcor’s patients. Such a system might lead to significantly improved care for members far from Alcor headquarters in Scottsdale, Arizona, by allowing them to be transported at lower temperatures. The engineer’s team is preparing a feasibility study for the design work and prototyping.

Among the topics of discussion were the safety aspects of using nitrogen vapor on aircraft and the whether the design can meet the standards imposed by the National Transportation Safety Board. Commercial aircraft is still preferred for transporting Alcor patients at significantly lower temperatures.

If the design proves feasible and the prototype is built, it will encourage the subsequent development of field vitrification techniques. Though field vitrification is a much longer-term proposal, the nitrogen shipper would be an essential element to any such development. A vitrified patient must be lowered to and kept at low temperature (lower than dry ice) or else ice crystals will start forming (devitrification), defeating the whole purpose. Design of the shipper would need to be nearly complete before field protocols could be changed. [TJ]

Training Dates: Florida & Texas
Florida: July 22 & 23 at Suspended Animation Inc in Boynton Beach
Texas: September 23 & 24 at the home of an Alcor member in Austin
Both training sessions will be from 8am-5pm on the above weekends followed by a Sunday evening party for local members and supporters.

Alcor training sessions are given throughout the year in a variety of locations for the purpose of training individuals to perform cryopreservation stabilization and transport procedures. Following training, you will become a member of the Regional Transport Team in your area and may be contacted if an Alcor member needs help.

Training sessions are attended by one or more Alcor personnel and offer an introduction to biohazard and safety protocols, advanced airway management, cardiopulmonary support and blood washout procedures. Training also includes introductions to negotiating with medical personnel, families and medical examiners or coroners.

Local medical professionals and members of Alcor or other cryonics organizations are eligible to attend. There is no charge for attendance but each person is responsible for their own travel and hotel expenses.
Please email Michelle Fry (michelle@alcor.org) if you would like to attend. [JC]

Facility Renovations
Some minor renovations are continuing in the new suite occupied by Alcor (unit 105). This suite was secured for storing the emergency transport vehicle and will be used for preparing medical kits, perfusate, and surgical kits. [SVS]

Marketing & Media
Alcor has entered into a new retainer agreement with WalshCOMM, its PR firm since 2004. Their objectives center around services in support of Alcor’s 3-year marketing plan.

Tanya Jones did a 20-minute radio interview for Life Online. The show is hosted by Bob Parsons, the CEO of Go Daddy Software, and airs on XM and Sirius satellite radio. The radio station is in the Scottsdale Airpark and the producer has seen the Alcor facility, which spurred his interest. [JC]

Membership Growth
On May 31, 2006, Alcor had 795 members on its Emergency Responsibility List. Three memberships were approved during this month, no memberships were reinstated, one membership was cancelled and no members were cryopreserved. Overall, there was a net gain of two members this month. [DC]

Cryonics Magazine
Do you have an idea for Cryonics magazine? Are you interested in publishing an advertisement? Contact the editor: jennifer@alcor.org.

Next Board Meeting
The next Board meeting is scheduled for Saturday, July 8, 2006, at 11:00 AM (MST). Board meetings are typically held on the first Saturday of the month at the Alcor facility (7895 East Acoma Drive in Scottsdale, AZ). Members and the public are encouraged to attend.

Employment Opportunities
Have you ever thought about joining the Alcor team? We have opportunities for licensed Paramedics, Emergency Medical Technicians, Registered Nurses, Lab Technicians and more to join our nationwide Transport Team. Participation is on a contractual basis. You’ll be given cryonics training enabling you to participate in our patient rescue and transport cases. Licensed professionals do not have to be Alcor members to join our team. We welcome your expertise and interest. Send your resume to: employment@alcor.org

Alcor United
Alcor members have a new forum where they can meet and chat with other members. Get to know other cryonics supporters in your area and around the world by visiting Alcor United (www.alcorunited.org).

Alcor News #51

Alcor News, May 2006
Your source for insider’s info May 2006, #51

Barbara Walters Visits Alcor

Barbara Walters interviewed Tanya Jones in Alcor’s conference room on April 29.

This bulletin is sent via email to anyone who requested it. Please do not reply to this message. Send comments, suggestions, or complaints to the editor, Mike Perry, (mike@alcor.org).

Subscribe/unsubscribe information is at the end of this newsletter. Contents are copyright 2006 by Alcor Foundation. Authors This Issue: Jennifer Chapman [JC], Diane Cremeens [DC], Tanya Jones [TJ], Mike Perry [MP], Steve Van Sickle [SVS].

REGISTER TODAY for the 6th Alcor Conference: An Inside Look at the Science and Medicine of Tomorrow. Registration is now open for the 6th Alcor Conference being held at the Scottsdale Marriott in Arizona from October 6-8. The early rate of $295 is in effect until August 1. Visit www.alcor.org to register. Check the website regularly for full conference details and updates. [JC]

Alcor Attends Singularity Institute Conference
Tanya Jones and Steve Van Sickle attended the Singularity Institute conference at Stanford on May 13 as representatives from Alcor. The conference featured such well-known futurists as Ray Kurzweil, Douglas Hofstadter, K. Eric Drexler, and Nick Bostrom. Alcor used this opportunity to interact with many Bay area cryonicists and to promote its own conference coming up in October. [JC, MP]

Media
CNN, Anderson Cooper 360
: We do not yet know when this broadcast will take place. It had been given a preliminary slot for late April but was removed to make room for “the news of the day”. The producers have agreed to inform us of the air date in advance.

ABC News, Barbara Walters Special: The biggest media event for Alcor in quite some time happened Saturday, April 29, when Barbara Walters visited Alcor and interviewed Tanya Jones and several Alcor members. Intensive media training was held–both for Alcor and the members being interviewed–and we expedited several facility upgrade projects (including new frames for the patient photos and setup of our new Patient Care Bay and operating room). This program will air in March 2007 and looks at ways to pursue life extension to age 150 or beyond.

In consultation with WalshCOMM, Alcor is now being much more selective in the media requests it accommodates. Several requests have been turned down, largely because they are from remote parts of the world. [JC]

Outreach: Entrepreneur’s Organization
Alcor has accepted an invitation to speak about cryonics for the Arizona chapter of the Entrepreneur’s Organization (http://www.eonetwork.org) on May 30th. A panel will introduce the audience to the cryonics process, the future technologies required for revival, and the challenges faced. This is our first speaking engagement this year. Tanya Jones will also be speaking at the Idea City in Ontario June 21-23 (http://www.ideacityonline.com/). [JC]

Facility Changes
During the past month many changes took place at the facility. We expanded into a new suite, moved our patients into the new Patient Care Bay and relocated most of the operating room to its new location.

We moved Dr. Sheleg’s lab and set up an equipment testing station for the perfusion automation project. The perfusion automation project, recently approved by the Research and Development Committee, is an extension and rebuild of our whole body perfusion system. It is based on the lessons we learned after a year of doing whole body cases using the new M22 cryoprotectant.

A new lathe and mill was installed in our workshop. This unit will be used for developing equipment prototypes. Bulk fabrication will continue to be done by contractors, but Alcor can now provide working prototypes for replication.

We also installed a new multi-purpose network printer/copier/scanner, which is connected to our network. This will reduce our reliance on individual desktop units and limit our printing expenses.

The broken air conditioner over the old patient care bay was replaced. We’ve also taken the opportunity to repair much of the old, under-sized air conditioning ducting above unit #110.

Overall, the facility has a much-improved appearance, if for no other reason than we have more room. The entire staff worked to make this happen, and everyone has done a great job. [TJ]

Patient Photos
Most of the photos of Alcor’s patients which hang on the walls have been reframed and relabeled. The previous name plates referred to the “First Life Cycle”, which had garnered so many odd looks from visitors. Replacing it is a simple date of birth and date of cryopreservation. The pictures are now in standard matching frames, matted in archival quality material. [SVS]

Patient Care Changes
The vacuum problems with the bulk tank identified last month were fixed after we discovered a leaky valve. To replace it we drained the tank over the course of a couple of weeks, using the liquid nitrogen to fill smaller vessels during regular patient maintenance.

For several years, oxygen sensors have been installed in the Patient Care Bay as a safety precaution in the event of a liquid nitrogen spill. These sensors have been moved to the new Patient Care Bay, along with the connecting fan system. The system used to control the fill of our dewars was redesigned and a preliminary prototype has been built.

Alcor has two new Bigfoot dewars, bringing our total of these large patient containers to 12. [TJ]

Northern California Training
Bill Voice held a training session in northern California April 22-23. It went well, with 4 local team members attending. Training included our biohazard lecture, which is the first lecture each year for any group to ensure our team members remain up-to-date on safety protocols. We covered patient handling, sternal intraosseous vascular access, cardiopulmonary support, use of a new respiratory impedance device, and a mechanical ventilator. A full walk-through of the stabilization was then performed. [TJ]

Membership Statistics
On April 30, 2006, Alcor had 793 members on its Emergency Responsibility List. Six memberships were approved during this month, no memberships were reinstated, two memberships were cancelled and no members were cryopreserved. Overall, there was a net gain of four members this month. [DC]

Next Board Meeting
The next Board meeting is scheduled for Saturday, June 3, 2006, at 11:00 AM (MST). Board meetings are typically held on the first Saturday of the month at the Alcor facility (7895 East Acoma Drive in Scottsdale, AZ). Members and the public are encouraged to attend.

Employment Opportunities
Have you ever thought about joining the Alcor team? We have opportunities for licensed Paramedics, Emergency Medical Technicians, Registered Nurses, Lab Technicians and more to join our nationwide Transport Team. Participation is on a contractual basis. You’ll be given cryonics training enabling you to participate in our patient rescue and transport cases. Licensed professionals do not have to be Alcor members to join our team. We welcome your expertise and interest. Send your resume to: employment@alcor.org

Alcor United
Alcor members have a new forum where they can meet and chat with other members. Get to know other cryonics supporters in your area and around the world by visiting Alcor United (www.alcorunited.org).

Alcor News #50

Alcor News, April 2006
Your source for insider’s info April 2006, #50

Patients Moved
After literally years of effort, finally everything was in readiness and our patients were moved into a new, much roomier location in our building on April 19. (Actually, all but one patient, who was moved over the following morning, April 20.) A crane service handled the main details. Some half-dozen 9,000-lb Bigfoot dewars were gently hoisted by forklift and crane and deposited in their new location. This seemed a thoroughly routine task for the movers and was completed in about two hours. We are all pleased that the move was largely uneventful and our patients are safely placed in their new location (see photo). [MP]

This issue of Alcor News is coming out a bit later than planned due to a heavy work load over the past few weeks, particularly the move of our patients (see below). We thank the reader for patience and hope to be back on a regular schedule soon. [MP]

This bulletin is sent via email to anyone who requested it. Please do not reply to this message. Send comments, suggestions, or complaints to the editor, Mike Perry, (mike@alcor.org). Subscribe/unsubscribe information is at the end of this newsletter. Contents are copyright 2006 by Alcor Foundation.

Authors This Issue: Jennifer Chapman [JC], Diane Cremeens [DC], Tanya Jones [TJ], Mike Perry [MP], Sergey Sheleg [SSH], Steve Van Sickle [SVS], Website Working Group [WWG].

Cryopreservation Case
One of our members (A-1237) suffered a sudden cardiac arrest sometime during the night of Feb. 27- 28 while at his home in Ohio. He lay undiscovered until his wife checked on him at 9:30 local time on the morning of the 28th. Paramedics were called, and the Coroners office initiated an investigation. After some discussion the wife wanted to waive the autopsy. (The Coroner had a policy that any autopsy would be fully invasive.) Luckily this option was allowed and the autopsy was avoided. Toxicology samples were taken to assist in the determination of causes of death.

The patient arrived at Alcor at about 11:30 a.m. Mar. 1. With a delay of between 34 and 42 hours since arrest, there was no cryoprotection. Instead we decided to take a few moments to establish acoustic monitoring of the brain, a slight change from our previous protocol in this sort of case; cryogenic cooling then commenced. This is Alcors 74th patient.

Another case was expected soon for a new member who had signed up with terminal cancer, and discussions continued for several weeks, as we attempted to arrange the stabilization well. Unfortunately, all this planning was for naught: the member contacted us late in March to cancel the arrangements. [TJ]

Research Update
Alcor’s Chief Research Scientist, Sergey Sheleg, finished the research paper About autolysis of the CNS neurons based on research data from the research project Dynamics of hypoxic brain damage after normothermic cardiac arrest and will send it to the peer-reviewed research journal Pathology International for publication. The paper interestingly shows an absence of autolytic (self-induced) damage in the brain up to six hours after cardiac arrest at room temperature (20 C), but signs of apoptosis (cell self-destruction) appear after nine hours.

Dr. Sheleg also started work on a new research project. He will be analyzing the intracellular damage (damage within the cells) of brain tissue using electron microscopy. His analysis will compare tissues that were cryopreserved with different cryoprotectants (M22 vitrification, glycerol, and direct freezing in liquid nitrogen). In this way we can compare the quality of preservation obtained with (1) our new vitrification protocol, (2) an earlier method using glycerol, and (3) straight freezing with no cryoprotection. [SSH]

Tim Reeves Incarcerated
The sentencing hearing of Tim Reeves on March 31 was attended by Tanya Jones and Stephen Van Sickle. Convicted of embezzling some $177,000 while a bookkeeper at Alcor, Reeves must now serve 12 months in the County Jail, to be followed by 5 years of supervised probation, with restitution to be determined by a hearing in May. The judge allowed that he could participate in a work furlough program, provided he meets its qualifications. Reeves read a statement in court expressing his remorse and asking for mercy. He requested the opportunity to contact Alcor to apologize, but was directed by the Court not to contact the victims. He was immediately taken into custody to begin his sentence, though that was something of a formality as he is currently serving 60 days for a DUI conviction. [SVS]

Florida Case
Alcor has received the settlement paperwork for the long-standing case involving a Florida member who was cryopreserved in 2004. We get uncontested custody of the patient, the $100,000 cryopreservation minimum, and $77,500 of our attorney fees. This money has been deposited in our lawyers escrow account, and once we review and sign some final documents, he will be sending us a check. [SVS]

Alcor Conference Registration
Registration for Alcor’s conference on October 6-8 will begin in May. Check the Alcor website (www.alcor.org) in a few weeks to take advantage of early rates. [JC]

Alcor Expands
Alcor took possession of unit 105 of its building April 1. This unit, with minimal modification, will allow us a separate and dedicated space for storing the transport vehicle, building and stocking transport kits, building perfusion tubing packs, and mixing perfusate. All of the lab space we currently have and the old Operating Room will be used exclusively for research. This space in turn will include small and large perfusion labs, a cryobiology and biochemistry lab, and a laboratory instrument room.

This is enough work space to keep several researchers working simultaneously full time. The usefulness of this space is not just that it allows us to forego some planned construction, but it also allows us to substantially increase our capabilities. For the first time in my experience, Alcor now has adequate technical and laboratory space. [SVS]

Bulk Tank Now in Service
Alcor’s bulk tank (the tank that holds spare liquid nitrogen) needed to be repaired before moving our patients. Like other containers of cold liquids, the tank is a double-walled vessel with a vacuum between the walls for insulation. The tank was prepared and received its first fill of liquid nitrogen. Some further problems developed but these fortunately were not too difficult to fix, and the tank is now in service.

The 900-gallon tank will be important to our expanding operation and should reduce the frequency of liquid nitrogen deliveries while providing a reservoir for use, among other things, in patient cooldowns. [MP, TJ]

UK Training
Alcor held a training session in Peacehaven, England on the weekend of March 11-12. It went extremely well, with around 25 UK and German attendees. Members of both Alcor and Cryonics Institute were trained in the Alcor stabilization protocols, as well as a few non- members. We made the decision to train anyone who wished to attend so we could continue promoting the Cryonics UK team. Training covered many topics and included a full walk- through of the stabilization process with participation by a portion of the trainees.

We intend to make UK training a regular portion of our annual training schedule and will be upgrading their stabilization equipment at the first opportunity.[TJ]

Membership Statistics
On March 31, 2006, Alcor had 789 members on its Emergency Responsibility List. Six memberships were approved during this month, no memberships were reinstated, two memberships were cancelled and no members were cryopreserved. Overall, there was a net gain of four members this month. [DC]

Next Board Meeting
The next Board meeting is scheduled for Saturday, May 6, 2006, at 11:00 AM (MST). Board meetings are typically held on the first Saturday of the month at the Alcor facility (7895 East Acoma Drive in Scottsdale, AZ). Members and the public are encouraged to attend.

Employment Opportunities
Have you ever thought about joining the Alcor team? We have opportunities for licensed Paramedics, Emergency Medical Technicians, Registered Nurses, Lab Technicians and more to join our nationwide Transport Team. Participation is on a contractual basis. You’ll be given cryonics training enabling you to participate in our patient rescue and transport cases. Licensed professionals do not have to be Alcor members to join our team. We welcome your expertise and interest. Send your resume to: employment@alcor.org

Alcor United
Alcor members have a new forum where they can meet and chat with other members. Get to know other cryonics supporters in your area and around the world by visiting Alcor United (www.alcorunited.org).

Alcor News #49 March 10, 2006

Alcor News, March 2006
Your source for insider’s info March 2006, #49
Tim Reeves Pleads Guilty
Former Alcor bookkeeper Tim Reeves, in a plea agreement, has pled guilty to 1 count of Attempted Fraudulent Schemes and Artifices. As part of the deal, he will be incarcerated in the Maricopa County Jail for no less than 8 months, and following that will be on probation for a total of 3.5 years. We will be applying for restitution in this case. Sentencing will be on March 31, 2006, at 1:30 pm before Judge Richard Gama at the Maricopa County Superior Court, Central Building. [SVS]

This bulletin is sent via email to anyone who requested it. Please do not reply to this message. Send comments, suggestions, or complaints to the editor, Mike Perry, (mike@alcor.org). Subscribe/unsubscribe information is at the end of this newsletter. Contents are copyright 2006 by Alcor Foundation. Authors This Issue: Jennifer Chapman [JC], Diane Cremeens [DC], Tanya Jones [TJ], Sergey Sheleg [SSH], Steve Van Sickle [SVS], Website Working Group [WWG].

Cryopreservation Cases
Some further details on last month’s case: On February 6 we were preparing for the cryopreservation of member A-1356. She was to be transported via air ambulance to Arizona, but her heart stopped before the flight time. The southern California remote kit was nearby her, as were Alcor team members in rotation as a precautionary measure. Unfortunately, her decline occurred extremely rapidly. Upon pronouncement, only one team member was on site. He administered and circulated some of the stabilization medications and began surface cooling. Once additional team members arrived, the patient was sent to a local facility for blood washout.

Because of the timing, we were unable to transport the patient to Alcor until the next morning. Her heart stopped about 15 minutes after the Department of Vital Statistics closed, and the county did not have provisions for after-hours access. Our cooperating funeral director worked with the family to ensure the paperwork was prepared for immediate submission in the morning, including driving to the physician’s home to obtain a signature on the death certificate. Unfortunately, he filed for the wrong permit. This error cost an additional three hours in transit time.

When the patient, a whole-body, arrived at the Alcor facility in Scottsdale, the open heart surgery was completed in short order. Cryoprotection began 75 minutes after her arrival. It continued through terminal concentrations, with the arterial, venous and burrhole samples being in close agreement.

Cooling was carried out in accordance with standard protocols, and the patient appeared to experience six cracking events during the temperature descent. She was transferred to a patient care dewar on February 23, 2006, and became Alcor’s 73rd patient.

Our second case in February was the sudden demise of a member in Ohio, A-1237. The 54-year-old gentleman with no known medical conditions died in the early morning hours of the 28th. His wife contacted Alcor after calling 911. With the cause of death uncertain, the police detectives contacted the Coroner’s Office. We discussed the possibility of a minimally invasive autopsy to establish the cause of death (information which is also of use to us). Unfortunately, county policy dictated that if an autopsy were to be performed, it would be comprehensive, compromising the cryopreservation. Furthermore, the autopsy would not even be scheduled until the next morning.

Because of the member’s long-time and strong desire for cryopreservation, his wife waived the autopsy in order to respect his wishes. The patient was released to a cooperating funeral home that same afternoon and transported to Arizona via commercial carrier. He is cooling now and is Alcor’s 74th patient. [TJ]

Research Update
The LESA fiber optic spectrofluorometer (see right) was tested using the Russian photosensitizer drug Photosens. Photosens appears to be a very useful agent for measuring cerebral circulation. This model can be used for testing different protocols related to improving perfusion in the brain during cryonics procedures.

Russian 5-aminolevulenic acid (5-ALA) photosensitizer was tested as a possible agent for a real-time test of tissue viability. The preliminary data showed that this drug does not penetrate the blood-brain barrier. The same experiment will be done using the lipotropic derivative methyl-5-ALA. [SSH]

2006 Conference Dates
Alcor has set the date for its 2006 conference: October 6-8. The location and speakers are still being determined. Registration will begin in a few months. [JC]

Transport Team Matters
We held the southern California training session the weekend of Feb. 18-19, covering biohazard protocols, sample collection, and the use of new devices deployed for stabilizations (intraosseous infusion and a respiratory impedance device). We also completed a stabilization simulation and held a debrief for local team members on A-1356.

Unfortunately, this was the last time we’ll be able to use our usual training facility. Our long-time southern California Co-Coordinator is closing up shop. If anyone wishes to volunteer a new location or has recommendations, please email Bill Voice (bill@alcor.org).

Three new team members are available in Arizona, thanks to Bill’s tireless recruiting efforts. Two EMTs and one respiratory therapist have been trained in the stabilization procedures and are available to participate in local standby and transport procedures. [TJ]

Media This Month
A record number of distinct computers visited Alcor’s website in February (30,270). Media participation this past month includes:
Zig Zag: The cryopreservation filming for this documentary took place in February as did sit-down interviews of Alcor representatives and members. The producers informed us that they intend to include Arthur Rowe in the documentary as a skeptic of cryonics.

CNN: As a result of the “Good Morning America” piece, CNN contacted Alcor about a piece for “Anderson Cooper 360” with on-air reporting by Sanjay Gupta, their medical correspondent. We expect this piece to focus on the medical aspects of cryonics and include a member interview. We will announce when to watch for it.

Scottsdale Times
: Also as a result of recent coverage, a reporter interviewed Tanya Jones, took a tour of the facility, and met with David Pizer about his wealth preservation arrangements.

Nouvo (Switzerland): This is Swiss Television’s newsmagazine devoted to technology, science and communications. Alcor provided B-roll footage to show an example of a cryonic suspension facility in the US, while the rest of the report discussed cryopreservation activities in Europe.

Big Aussie Breakfast: Tanya Jones gave a 10-15 minute radio interview for this morning show.

ABC News, Barbara Walters Special
: Alcor was contacted about a Barbara Walters Special to focus on how to live longer and stay younger. This piece is in the initial stages of planning.
Many of the above articles are available online (http://www.alcor.org/press/newsstories.html)

Membership Statistics
On February 28, 2006, Alcor had 785 members on its Emergency Responsibility List. One membership was approved during this month, no memberships were reinstated, three memberships were cancelled and two members were cryopreserved. Overall, there was a net loss of three members this month.

Next Board Meeting
The next Board meeting is scheduled for Saturday, April 1, 2006, at 11:00 AM (MST). Board meetings are typically held on the first Saturday of the month at the Alcor facility (7895 East Acoma Drive in Scottsdale, AZ). Members and the public are encouraged to attend.

Employment Opportunities
Have you ever thought about joining the Alcor team? We have opportunities for licensed Paramedics, Emergency Medical Technicians, Registered Nurses, Lab Technicians and more to join our nationwide Transport Team. Participation is on a contractual basis. You’ll be given cryonics training enabling you to participate in our patient rescue and transport cases. Licensed professionals do not have to be Alcor members to join our team. We welcome your expertise and interest. Send your resume to: employment@alcor.org

Alcor United
Alcor members have a new forum where they can meet and chat with other members. Get to know other cryonics supporters in your area and around the world by visiting Alcor United (www.alcorunited.org).

:: jennifer@alcor.org
:: http://www.alcor.org
:: 877-462-5267
End of Alcor News bulletin #49 dated March 10, 2006.
©2006 Alcor Life Extension Foundation. All rights reserved.