Alcor News

Alcor News

News Blog of the Alcor Life Extension Foundation

Member A-2408 becomes Alcor’s 175th patient on November 16, 2019

A-2408 was a confidential, 52-year-old, male with whole-body arrangements for cryopreservation. He had been a member since 2009 and had stage IV lung cancer. He was pronounced clinically dead in New Jersey on November 16, 2019, at 07:29 hrs. MST.

He was flown to Alcor for cryoprotection and entered cryogenic cool down on November 17, 2019. Three members of the Alcor New York group drove to New Jersey to assist with shipping the patient to Alcor; their participation was invaluable. He become Alcor’s 175th patient.

Member A-2366 becomes Alcor’s 174th patient on October 6, 2019

Member A-2366, a confidential, male neuro member was pronounced on October 6, 2019 in Washington state. After arriving early in the morning of October 7, A-2366 was perfused with cryoprotectant and entered cool down.

Two team members arrived at the member’s location on September 29 to check on him. That morning, we learned that the member’s doctor said A-2366 was better and seemed to be recovering. The doctor and family looked to moving him to a skilled nursing facility if he continued to improve. The Alcor team felt that he was still at significant risk and so remained. The next day, while we continued to be concerned about his condition, his doctor remained optimistic, saying that he continued to improve slowly. On October 1 we were told that the hospital planned to discharge the member to return to a rehab facility. Plans changed frequently.

On the morning of October 5, the hospice nurse said she believed the member would go down in the next 48 hours. Alcor CEO, Max More, immediately called for a deployment by Suspended Animation. They arrived that afternoon. Less than 24 hours later, on October 6, the member was pronounced, and SA conducted a washout and other standard procedures. On October 7, A-2366 arrived at Alcor and underwent cryoprotective perfusion followed by cool down for long-term storage.

Member A-3217 becomes Alcor’s 173rd patient on September 30, 2019

A-3217, a confidential, 55-year old, female, neurocryopreservation member, was pronounced legally dead on September 30, 2019 in Alberta, Canada.

A-3217 had been a member of Alcor since January 31, 2019. In August her family alerted Alcor that her cancer was progressing. Alcor suggested relocating the member to a Scottsdale, Arizona hospice. This would eliminate transport delays and avoid possible legal and regulatory problems due to Alberta’s jurisdiction. A late relocation is never easy and the family decided not to pursue that option.

While engaging in a standby for another member on the West Coast, Alcor heard from the family on September 30, 2019. Her physicians did not expect her to live more than 24 hours. Based on new information, a medical advisor agreed that an immediate deployment was called for. Alcor immediately relocated a team member from the West Coast to Alberta and engaged International Cryomedicine Experts (ICE) to take charge of stabilization and transport. Several Alcor staff provided additional coordination and logistics planning.

The member had declined unexpectedly rapidly. Just the day before pronouncement, the member’s spouse said that doctors thought A-3217 had another couple of weeks. The shortage of time combined with bad weather (delaying flights from the USA) and local regulations to create major barriers to a timely response. The challenges were met with strong teamwork, cooperation from the family, and efforts by the funeral home to expedite the required transit permit. Team members administered some medications early on followed by additional medications when more team members arrived.

The funeral home had originally told Alcor that it would take three days to get a transit permit. By going to the relevant office in person they hoped to get a same-day release. In the end, we had to wait overnight as the patient cooled to get clearance to move. Even though there was no funding for a private flight, Alcor decided to secure one in order to shave crucial time off the transport. This enabled us to conduct cryoprotection despite a longer transport time than desired.

Members who do not provide funding for a private flight should not expect Alcor to arrange one. In this case, the decision was justified by our ability to also use the flight to get a full field neurocryopreservation kit into Canada.

A-3217 arrived at Alcor on October 1, 2019. After cryoprotection she went into cryogenic cooldown at 19:36 hrs.

Jianhau Ma, member A-3259, becomes Alcor’s 171st patient on August 8, 2019

Jianhau Ma, Alcor member A-3259, a non-confidential 50-year old female Alcor member with whole-body cryopreservation arrangements, was pronounced legally dead on August 8, 2019 in Boston, MA. She had stage IV ovarian cancer and had been an Alcor member for less than a month. Washout in the field was prevented by bad weather prohibiting the team from getting to the patient in time. In order to reduce ischemic time, the patient was flown by air ambulance to Alcor where whole-body perfusion was performed.

Cryogenic cooldown was initiated on August 9, 2019 and terminated on August 15, 2019. That day, Jianhau became Alcor’s 171st patient.

Gordon Norman, member A-1833, becomes Alcor’s 170th patient on May 26, 2019

Gordon Norman, Alcor member A-1833, a non-confidential whole body member, was pronounced legally dead on May 26, 2019 in Knoxville, TN. Mr. Norman, a member since 2000, received a brief standby followed by stabilization, field blood substitution, and transport by Suspended Animation in Knoxville and underwent cryoprotective perfusion at Alcor on May 27. That day, he became Alcor’s 170th patient.

Arthur Naiman, member A-1499, becomes Alcor’s 169th patient on May 13, 2019

Arthur Naiman, member A-1499, a non-confidential whole body member was pronounced legally dead on May 13, 2019 in Tucson, Arizona. After a four-day standby followed by stabilization and transport carried out by Alcor’s Medical Response Director and his local team, Mr. Naiman was cryoprotected at Alcor and started cool down on May 13. Mr. Naiman has been an Alcor member since 1995.

Bahareh Bina, A-3240 becomes Alcor’s 168th patient on April 29, 2019

Bahareh Bina (A-3240), a non-confidential female neurocryopreservation member from Bellevue, King County, Washington, became Alcor’s 168th patient on April 29, 2019.

On April 27th, Alcor deployed contractor Suspended Animation (SA) to Washington state, accompanied by Alcor’s Medical Response Director, Chris Divver, as an observer. The standby team set up at the Ms. Bahareh Bina’s house that evening. Bahareh was a 33-year old female member with mesenchymal chondrosarcoma, a form of cancer. She had been released from a hospital into home hospice care. The member and her family did not want to relocate to hospice care in Scottsdale, AZ.

It was discovered that King County stood out from other counties in the state by being especially demanding and difficult when it comes to obtaining a transit permit to move a legally deceased person out-of-state. Although, in Washington state, a hospice RN can make a legal pronouncement of death over the phone from family, without having to see the patient, they cannot help with the transit permit. Efforts by the team avoided the potential delay.

Bahareh Bina was pronounced legally deceased at 11:53 by a hospital nurse on April 29, 2019, in Bellevue, Washington. Despite concerns, surgery and washout went quickly and smoothly and paperwork was organized and received quickly. Cooling, stabilization, and medication administration followed. SA’s surgeon and perfusionist conducted a whole-body washout with organ preservation solution. Bahareh arrived by plane in Phoenix at 21:00 and arrived at Alcor at 22:15. Cryoprotection started sooner after, followed by cool down.

Jerry Searcy, A-1039, becomes Alcor’s 167th patient on March 24, 2019

Jerry Searcy, a non-confidential neuropreservation member became Alcor’s 167th patient on March 24, 2019, in Scottsdale, AZ. Jerry had been an Alcor member since 1979 and was a very active volunteer. His death was sudden and unexpected as Jerry seemed to be in good health for his age. Fortunately, the medical examiner released him to us without any damaging autopsy. It is not known how long the period of ischemia was – other than it cannot have been more than 24 hours.